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‘The Housing Wealth Effect’

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Boston condos

Here’s a primer on how a recovering housing market helps the overall economy, as opposed to how a crashing housing market hurts the overall economy.

File under: More please

Personal bankruptcies in Mass. plunged in 2012

Boston condos

Boston condos

The number of individuals filing for personal bankruptcies in Massachusetts fell by more than 18 percent last year, to about 11,964, the Warren Group reports.

In other words: It’s more good news about the economy.

Perhaps it might be described as better news, considering where we were coming from in terms of the economy.

Inflation since the American Revolution

Boston housing

Boston housing

This post may not have much to do with housing, but this is a pretty impressive chart tracking inflation since the American Revolution.

Well, maybe housing is involved, considering how much home prices have risen over the decades and helped drive up overall costs for most Americans.

Btw: The chart, via and as presented by ZeroHedge, is supposed to be a damning indictment of the Federal Reserve system (the vertical red line is when the Fed was created in the early 1900s). We’re not in the position to argue for or against that point. We just think it’s a cool, if slightly depressing, chart.

‘The student loan bubble mirrors the housing crisis’

http://i.huffpost.com/gen/820976/thumbs/s-STUDENT-LOAN-DEBT-INCREASES-large300.jpg

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Here’s a thought-provoking article about how the current student-loan bubble resembles the build up to last decade’s housing bubble — complete with absurdly easy credit, low lending standards, government-backed loans, and large private lenders all too ready to push the risk envelope because they know they won’t be held responsible.

More than likely, it probably won’t — or can’t — end the same way the housing market did, i.e. a total collapse of market demand and prices, sparked and intensified by a faltering overall economy. But the combination of easy credit and escalating prices of higher education is eerily similar to last decade’s run up to the housing debacle. Who knows how it will end?

File under: De ja vu all over again.