There aren’t many words in the English language better than “grouse”. It’s almost an onomatopoeia.

“You’d better stop griping about my grousing,” you’d say.

Anyway, one thing people love to grouse about is the high cost of housing in Massachusetts.

It’s a topic especially popular with readers of the Boston Herald. As is illegal immigration, communism, the color of a person’s skin, and the weight of our Mayor.

Well, according to a new study, we don’t have it so bad, when it comes to the cost of housing, at least when compared to the rest of the country.

A new report is casting some doubt on the widespread notion that high housing costs here are leading to a migration of young professionals out of Massachusetts.

The report, released by the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston’s New England Public Policy Center, doesn’t dispute that housing costs are a major concern as policymakers grapple with how to attract and keep workers in the region.

But the “briefing paper” report, authored by Fed analyst Heather Brome, questions whether colleged-educated “young professionals” – between the ages of 25 and 39 – are really leaving the area in droves due to stubbornly high housing prices in Massachusetts and the rest of New England.

The real reasons people move? According to the results of the study (which I’ve also read elsewhere, btw), the top reasons young people move are: job opportunities, and to be close to family.

Sure, housing costs a lot in Boston. Then again, you make a lot more money than you would in Austin, Texas. Or East St. Louis, Mo.

Study: Housing costs not so bad; Many make more, can pay more – By Jay Fitzgerald, The Boston Herald

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