There are two types of real estate appraisal reports; FNMA or lender reports and market value or non-lender reports.  For this article I will focus on the 7 most common issues and errors with market value appraisals.  All errors are violation of the requirements set forth in an ever-changing  set of quality control standards called the Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice (USPAP) to which all appraisers are bound.

The 7 Most Common Issues and Errors with Market Value Real Estate Appraisals

  1. Using the wrong appraisal form

    Boston real estate appraisals

  2. Missing highest and best use analysis
  3. Excluding an approach to value with no explanation
  4. No reconciliation between various value approaches
  5. Lacking time adjustments
  6. Incorrect date of value
  7. Factual errors

Using the wrong appraisal form

Sometimes I see forms that were designed by FNMA for use with federally insured loans being used for divorce, probate, pre-listing, tax or other non-lending appraisals.  So how does this cause a problem? These lending forms have pre-printed scopes of work, certifications and intended uses and intended users that are not appropriate for non-lender assignments. 

Missing highest and best use analysis

Highest and best use is always that use which would produce the highest value for a property, regardless of its actual current use. It is necessary for the appraiser to develop an opinion of the properties highest and best use and then to report a summary of the analysis within the appraisal report.

No reconciliation between various value approaches

There are three approaches to value;  the cost approach, the income approach and the sales comparison approach.  When an appraiser uses more than one approach usually they won’t lead to exactly the same value.  So how does an appraiser arrive at one final opinion of value?  the process is called the reconciliation between value approaches.

An appraiser does not have to develop all three of the approaches to value as long as the resulting conclusion is not compromised and can be relied upon for its intended use. However, the appraiser is required to explain why any of the three approaches  was excluded.

 Lacking time adjustments

When the real estate market has increased (or decreased) since the time a comparable was sold a date of sale adjustment will help to bring the old comp up to date with the current market.  The lack of an adjustment in this case is likely to affect the final valuation.

 Incorrect date of value

Each appraisal has an effective date of value. It can be current, retroactive (past) or prospective (future).  I primarily see this error with tax abatement appraisals.  When homes are assessed for 2014 taxes the values were based on the fair market value of the home as of January 1st 2013.  In that case the appraiser must complete a retrospective appraisal using only sales that closed before January 1st 2013, the effective date of value.

Factual Errors

Most appraisals tend to rely on the sales comparison approach to value. This means that fact checking comparable sales is perhaps the most important parts of the appraisal process.  The MLS data is entered by individual brokers and not policed by MLS or anybody else.  As a result it is full of errors.  As the saying  goes “garbage in, garbage out” meaning that  the use of inaccurate data will lead an appraiser to arrive at an inaccurate valuation.

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Author Profile

John Ford
John Ford
EXPERIENCE

Over the course of 20 years in the Boston downtown real estate market, John represented and sold numerous, condominiums, investment and development properties in Greater Boston and in the surrounding suburbs



In addition to representing Boston condo buyers and sellers, John is currently one of the most recognized Boston condo blog writers regarding Boston condominiums and residential real estate markets. John's insights and observations about the Boston condo market have been seen in a wide variety of the most established local & national media outlets including; Banker and Tradesman, Boston Magazine The Boston Globe, The Boston Herald and NewsWeek and Fortune magazine, among others.



HISTORY

For over 24 years, John Ford, of Ford Realty Inc., has been actively involved in the real estate industry. He started his career in commercial real estate with a national firm Spaulding & Slye and quickly realized that he had a passion for residential properties. In 1999, John entered the residential real estate market, and in 2000 John Started his own firm Ford Realty Inc. As a broker, his clients have come to love his fun, vivacious, and friendly attitude. He prides himself on bringing honesty and integrity to the entire home buying and selling process. In addition to helping buyers and sellers, he also works with rental clients. Whether you’re looking to purchase a new Boston condo or rent an apartment, you’ll quickly learn why John has a 97% closing rate.

AREAS COVERED

Back Bay

Beacon Hill

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Contact
John Ford and his staff can be reached at 617-595-3712 or 617-720-5454. Please feel free to stop by John's Boston Beacon Hill office located at 137 Charles Street.




John Ford
Ford Realty Inc
137 Charles Street
Boston, Ma 02114

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